Notes, Domino, Java and Open Source 

By Paul Withers | 2/14/19 9:32 AM | App Dev - Open Source | Added by John Oldenburger

As hopefully most developers are aware, at the beginning of the year Oracle changed the licensing terms for Java JREs (Java Runtime Environment), requiring a paid commercial license for any commercial use. For most Notes and Domino customers, that has meant no change. As long as I can remember, Notes (on Windows) and Domino have bundled their own JRE.

Recent Java Updates from IBM 

By Niklas Heidloff | 2/12/19 3:43 PM | App Dev - Open Source | Added by Kenio Carvalho

Oracle has changed the licensing for commercial use. Fortunately IBM open sourced OpenJ9 which is available together with the OpenJDK at no cost from AdoptOpenJDK, even for commercial use.

Re-Launching OpenNTF Snippets 

By OpenNTF | 2/11/19 4:53 AM | App Dev - Open Source | Added by Oliver Busse

In time for IBM Think's Community Day, we're relaunching our snippets site. If you haven't noticed, things have been changing as OpenNTF has more explicitly embraced a wider community. Yes, we've always covered all of what has been IBM Collaboration Solutions / HCL Collaboration Workflow Platforms.

XPages to Java EE, Part 6: Dependencies 

By Jesse Gallagher | 2/1/19 2:45 AM | App Dev - Open Source | Added by Oliver Busse

This is going to be a quick post, but I think it's useful to treat the topic of third-party dependencies on its own because of how much nicer it is with a Maven-based app than an NSF or OSGi plugin. Historically, we've handled dependencies primarily by downloading a Jar and either plunking it in jvm/lib/ext on the server, stashing it in a Java agent or script library, or importing it into the NSF as a Jar design element for XPages. With OSGi plugins, that remained the simplest way to do it too: just drop the Jar into the plugin and add it to the bundle classpath.

XPages to Java EE, Part 5: Web Pages 

By Jesse Gallagher | 1/24/19 12:23 PM | App Dev - Open Source | Added by Oliver Busse

Once upon a time, web pages were easy: you'd write some HTML directly or, if you're fancy, use some Server Side Includes or PHP. Now, though, it's a rat's nest of decisions and stacks - fortunately for me, going into the pros and cons of each approach is beyond the scope of this series. Suffice it to say that Java EE can cover your needs whatever approach you take: it can do basic dynamic HTML generation, server-persisted frameworks like JSF, and work splendidly as a backend for a client JS app thanks to JAX-RS.

XPages to Java EE, Part 4: Application Servers 

By Jesse Gallagher | 1/23/19 6:15 PM | App Dev - Open Source | Added by Oliver Busse

I mentioned in the terminology post that one of the new things to get used to in Java EE is the concept of a "Servlet Container" or "Application Server", and I think that this concept is worth a bit of going in to. In a general sense, we've been working with this concept for a good while now: Domino is an application server in several senses, and (for the most part) the NSFs are the applications it houses. It blurs the lines in a couple ways by virtue of NSFs also being data stores, but an XPages application is a pretty direct match for a .war file deployed to an application server, code-wise.